Evan Schuman

About the Author Evan Schuman


Apple’s clever strategy for forcing partners to use Face ID

When Apple announced the iPhone X last week, the most sophisticated (and widely predicted) feature revealed was the facial recognition approach, called Face ID. But by choosing to go all or nothing with the iPhone X — it’s only Face ID, with no support for Touch ID — the big risk for Apple was that all the companies that support Touch ID in their apps wouldn’t quickly make the move to Face ID. So Apple made the decision for them.

As the recent healthcare debate in the U.S. demonstrated, it’s extremely hard to take back something people have grown to like. Apple’s choice of biometric authentication faced the same problem. If Amazon, Chase, Fidelity or any of the other major companies whose apps use Touch ID as a way to log in without a password had failed to make the move to Face ID, their customers would have been forced to go back to typing in long passwords. Apple, ever mindful of customer experience, chose to not permit that to happen. To make sure that companies use Face ID in their apps, Apple simply didn’t give them any practical choice.

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Is mobile killing the LAN?

I was talking with an industry CEO the other day and he offered an intriguing thought. He said that the LAN is dead — along with its associated routers and hubs and other network hardware — and that mobile has killed it. But the LAN isn’t dead, I resisted, noting that there are LANs within just about every corporate campus in the country.

And yet his argument can’t be dismissed. All of the data and security assumptions that existed when LANs came into being have gone away, courtesy of cloud and mobile. Still, I insisted, that’s an argument for why LANs should be dead, not that they are.

Let’s explore this a bit more. The CEO I was chatting with is Steven Sprague, from a cybersecurity vendor called Rivetz.

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NIST: In mobile authentication, think hardware, not software

Retail is in an awkward in-between stage when it comes to online security. In shifting their purchasing to online options, shoppers are using both desktop computers and mobile devices. Had they moved straight to mobile, authentication options would be numerous, including selfies and other biometric authentication such as fingerprints.

But the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence (NCCoE) is trying to bolster security and authentication on desktops and mobile devices. It was spurred to tackle its Multifactor Authentication for e-Commerce project because of the realization that increased security in the physical world (with such steps as cards with EMV chips) means that thieves are going to start to focus more on card-not-present transactions.

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Retailers can go Google, or they can go mobile

One of the top marketing analytics goals for retailers has, for years, been the single view of the customer. That means being able to identify shoppers as they move from desktop to mobile to in-store and when they phone a call center. A mobile device that typically stays with a person at almost all times has been seen by many as the answer — and it is.

But Google has been pushing an alternative theory, which is to trust it blindly. It doesn’t quite phrase it that way, but that’s where it ends up. On Monday (July 31), a major privacy organization, the Electronic Privacy Information Center, filed a legal complaint with the U.S. Federal Trade Commission asking federal officials to look into a Google program that extracts data from payment card records.

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What Amazon Prime Day tells us about mobile app loyalty

Amazon’s annual Prime Day sale once again gave it its “biggest day ever” last week. But Sense360, a digital research firm, wanting to see what impact Amazon’s big numbers had on the foot traffic in its rivals’ physical stores, decided to track shoppers who did and did not use the Amazon app.

The results showed a 7% drop in foot traffic during the Prime Day promotion among those who didn’t have the Amazon app and a 32% drop among those who did have the app. Sense360 tracked the behavior of 1.1 million shoppers who use a variety of apps from companies that partner with Sense360. Sense360 CEO Eli Portnoy wouldn’t identify those apps or say how many were used, beyond that it was “more than 50 and fewer than 100.”

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What does Amazon Prime Day tell us about mobile app loyalty?

Amazon’s annual Prime Day sale once again gave it its “biggest day ever” last week. But Sense360, a digital research firm, wanting to see what impact Amazon’s big numbers had on the foot traffic in its rivals’ physical stores, decided to track shoppers who did and did not use the Amazon app.

The results showed a 7% drop in foot traffic during the Prime Day promotion among those who didn’t have the Amazon app and a 32% drop among those who did have the app. Sense360 tracked the behavior of 1.1 million shoppers who use a variety of apps from companies that partner with Sense360. Sense360 CEO Eli Portnoy wouldn’t identify those apps or say how many were used, beyond that it was “more than 50 and fewer than 100.”

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Are you sharing more data with Google than you have to?

Whether your concerns are privacy, security, competitive advantage, intellectual property or risk avoidance, your enterprise needs to be sharing — literally — as little data as possible with employees, contractors and third parties. As obvious as that statement is, it’s stunning how much data is unnecessarily shared with cloud providers and others.

There are two reasons for this. First, the time and effort needed to be remove data that the third party doesn’t truly need from the data that is needed can make the ROI seem unattractive. This is especially true when executives play down the risk of anything bad happening.

As in “I’m probably safe trusting Google/Microsoft/Amazon/Rackspace, etc.” Really? Even if you choose to assume that their security is stellar — it isn’t — what about competitive issues? Are you really willing to trust that they will handle your data with your best interests at heart?

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Facial recognition in the new iPhone would make huge waves

With several sources that traditionally have been reliable about such things reporting that Apple is preparing to abandon the fingerprint biometric authentication that it’s been using for five years in favor of 3D facial recognition coupled with iris scans, the mobile industry is preparing for authentication upheaval.

The most likely scenario is that Apple will include this new biometric approach on perhaps one model of the new iPhones, with the others continuing to use Touch ID.

+ Also on Computerworld: Dual biometrics may just be the authentication answer we need +

The driver for this move, according to analysts tracking the company, is a desire to free up space on the phone to allow for a larger screen in a similarly sized device. Keeping the phone pocket-sized means that phones simply can’t get much larger than the current iPhone 7 Plus. (Yes, you scoffers out there. The iPhone 7 Plus—at 6.23 inches tall, 3.07 inches wide and 0.29 inches deep—does fit in my deepest pockets, but just barely. Fits into suit jackets, too, but, again, just barely.)

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Memo to IT: You do know that a mobile phone is still a phone, right?

Technologists have always been drawn to bright and shiny objects. That’s why mobile development has focused on geolocation, streaming video, biometrics and impressive app gymnastics. But the core of the mobile phone — at it’s heart, it is a telephone, capable of making voice calls — has generally been ignored. As Zappos has discovered, that can be very bad for business.

What the retailer figured out is that texts, emails and other customer communications are far less effective at closing sales than what Alexander Graham Bell thought up. This is one of those surprising conclusions that, if you think about, shouldn’t be surprising at all. Texting and email force the customer to type everything they are saying, instead of just talking about it.

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Supreme Court to look at mobile privacy. Uh-oh.

Does the prospect of your company’s worst enemies getting access to full tracking information on your employees’ mobile phones freak you out? If so, you’ll want to track something yourself: a case the U.S. Supreme Court just agreed to consider. 

Although the case involves criminal law and the question of whether police need a court-issued search warrant for intimate mobile records, one former federal prosecutor points out that the Court’s ruling could open the door to civil discovery and subpoena access. In other words, the ruling could make such mobile data available to anyone who chooses to sue your company, for any reason, whether the claim is legitimate or not. 

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Amazon Go is a great mobile solution, but for the wrong problem

A long-held retail IT fantasy is that complete item-level RFID will be deployed. In theory, this would allow both merchant and shopper to know precisely where every item is, making both inventory and finding that wayward box of strawberry-flavored corn flakes quite easy. But the economics of placing an RFID tag — the cost of which still tends to plateau at about five cents each — have made it nonviable for all but the most expensive products.

Hold that thought for a moment. Now let’s consider Amazon Go, which is Amazon’s attempt at an entirely automated physical store. But instead of RFID tags, it uses cameras and video analytics. It presumably starts with a perfectly accurate snapshot of every item in the store and knows exactly where each one is situated.

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IDG Contributor Network: Amazon Go is a great mobile solution, but for the wrong problem

A long-held retail IT fantasy is that complete item-level RFID will be deployed. In theory, this would allow both merchant and shopper to know precisely where every item is, making both inventory and finding that wayward box of strawberry-flavored corn flakes quite easy. But the economics of placing an RFID tag — the cost of which still tends to plateau at about five cents each — have made it nonviable for all but the most expensive products.

Hold that thought for a moment. Now let’s consider Amazon Go, which is Amazon’s attempt at an entirely automated physical store. But instead of RFID tags, it uses cameras and video analytics. It presumably starts with a perfectly accurate snapshot of every item in the store and knows exactly where each one is situated.

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Dual biometrics may just be the authentication answer we need

A major problem with biometric authentication is that, when it doesn’t work, there are few good options to proceed with the authentication. When the system says that’s not your eyeball, there’s no fallback akin to “Forgot your password?” You have to revert to some less discerning authentication method, such as a PIN. 

Some vendors are trying to deal with this by using a simultaneous, multi-biometric method. “Simultaneous” is important because using two methods consecutively would take more time, resulting in end users’ resistance and lower participation rates. 

One vendor, Sensory, is making serious headway in figuring out interesting ways to use dual biometrics.

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IDG Contributor Network: Self-checkout: What shoppers want to do is rarely what they end up doing

One of the first things retail executives learn is that shopper surveys are horrible indicators of what shoppers will do in stores. Asked if they would make purchases at a breached retailer, they’ll routinely say no. But quarterly earnings betray the truth that being breached has just about zero influence on revenue. (Blame zero liability, but that’s a column for another day.)

The issue for today is self-checkout. Surveys show that shoppers love the idea. Retailer experience shows that shoppers don’t love self-checkout the reality nearly as much as they love self-checkout the concept. Reality messes things up, with fruits and vegetables that need weighing and age-restricted products and long lines and filled-to-the-brim shopping carts that were never supposed to be handled at self-checkout. Shoppers are quick to dismiss the value of an associate at a staffed checkout lane, ignoring the fact that their experience of scanning millions of SKUs makes them awfully good at it and impressively fast.

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IDG Contributor Network: Amazon successfully fights off pricebots

One big downside of the plethora of e-commerce shopping bots out there today is that they create the impression of a difference when there may not be one. If I may give my two cents’ worth, is a two-cent difference meaningful, especially when shipping prices are far more than that?

Significant difference or not, shoppers love them. And even more importantly, they act on them. When a bot lists a product and shows 20 different sites, the ranking by lowest price is almost always selected. After price, reputation and customer reviews can play a role, but none persuade as effectively as price.

That’s why Walmart, which wears its tagline about having the lowest prices the way Marley’s Ghost wears his chains (each one is weighed down by bad decisions made years ago), takes pricebots so seriously. Unfortunately for Walmart, so does Amazon. And Amazon doesn’t seem to care one bit for Walmart’s price trackers — and chose to block them all.

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Missing protection: Corporate B2B privacy policies

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With security awareness, money talks

According to a recent report, academics have been analyzing brainwaves of computer users to improve how they are alerted to cybersecurity dangers. I’m sorry, but getting users to pay stricter attention to security isn’t brain surgery: It’s all about money and job security. Come to think of it, job security itself is all about money, which makes money the only carrot and the only stick that IT needs.

That report, courtesy of Bloomberg BNA, said, “Many computer users automatically swat away repetitive dialogue box warnings of impending doom, especially when they are engaged in another activity. Now, engineers are using data analytics based on user tracking to discover what might help users pay attention to warnings. Software engineers are exploring promising techniques, such as changing background colors in warning notifications and switching formats to distinguish substantial security warnings from mundane messages. Tapping people’s brains helps the engineers design more effective user interfaces.”

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